May 122012
 

Today at The Football Fan Spot we have Western Illinois cornerback and NFL Draft Prospect, Patrick Stoudamire. He made the Division I-AA All-American 2nd team last year and made the All-Missouri Valley Conference first team in each of the last 3 years. He is regarded, for the most part, as a 4th-6th round prospect. A merchant cash advance is something that we will not see in Stoudamire’s immediate future, his prospects as an NFL player looks like a good one! Today he has come around to talk to us about his experience playing this game and his Pre-Draft thoughts.

The Football Fan Spot: You played last year in Division I-AA. How do you think playing in Division I-AA compares to playing in Division I? Would you say it’s a bit of a disadvantage coming from a smaller school background as you try to transition to the NFL?

Patrick Stoudamire: I believe the only thing that is different between D1-AA and D1-A is the front 7, because it is shown in the past that D1-AA and smaller are actually producing well in the NFL. I believe if you can lock up a receiver at D1-AA you can in D1-A. I showed that in the East-West game and practices. The only disadvantage I would say is the quarterbacks in D1-AA do not throw at a good corner but the D1-A school quarterbacks do over and over which allows those corners to rack up INTs and pass break-ups, and also a lot of passes caught and scored on. But the transition into the NFL is always going to be a shocker just like it was to become a collegiate player. The speed and the strength and crisp routes by the receivers and the arm accuracy and strength and power of the quarterbacks all improve.

TFFS: You got a chance to play in the East-West shrine game despite your small school background. What was that experience like?

PS: The experience of the East/West game was a once in the life time experience because of the kids, visiting the hospital was very life changing, we were running so those kids can walk. And on the football aspect it was great because I got to go against the best, Freddie Barnes and Blair White in practice everyday and showing the scouts that I can guard whoever is in front of me.

TFFS: Do you think you did a good job of showing what kind of pro you could be to the scouts watching or were there a few things you wish you could have done differently?

PS: I hope I grabbed the attention of the scouts even if it was only one because all it takes is one.

TFFS: Which players at the East/West game, either on your team or the opposing team, really impressed you most?

PS: Blair White impressed me the most. His routes were very crisp and he was faster and more quicker than I thought.

TFFS: You didn’t get a chance to work out at the Combine, but you have a Pro Day coming up. How have you been preparing for that?

PS: Even though I didn’t get an invite to the combine, I still went on my way to train even harder to prove that I should have and I have been working out at Perfect Competition with Auto Bolden as my speed coach and Brain Martin and his crew. Now I am working on my starts to better my 40.

TFFS: Who do you compare yourself most to in the NFL? Is there anyone you model your game after?

PS: Champ Bailey, a lock down corner and my style of play is like Nnamdi Asomugha he is just so dominant out there.

TFFS: A little bit of background stuff, when did you start playing football? Who did were some of your favorite players to watch as a kid? Favorite team to watch?

PS: I started playing football in 4th grade I believe. The earlier years were just for fun, started out in flag. My favorite players as a kid were Brett Favre and Champ Bailey. My favorite team was Green Bay with Brett Favre, Antonio Freeman, Reggie White, and Dorsey Levens. Beast team.

TFFS: When did you first realize that you had a really got shot at the NFL?

PS: I realized my sophomore year that I had a great chance in playing in the NFL so I gave up playing basketball. I did play two sports my freshman year that is why I went to WIU and not a bigger school.

TFFS: Give me a little bit of a self scouting report, what do you say you could contribute most to an NFL team? What is your biggest weakness or thing you need to work on most?

PS: A very good sized corner with speed and the determination to do what it takes to get the job done. The biggest thing I need to work on and can always improve is driving through the receiver, which I worked on a lot in the East/West Shrine game/practice.

TFFS: Which, if any, NFL teams have contacted you up to this point?

PS: I talked with the Bears, Jaguars, Falcons, Patriots, Redskins, Buccaneers, Panthers, just to name a few.

TFFS: Your former teammate, Jason Williams, was a 3rd round pick of the Dallas Cowboys last year. Have you been keeping in contact with him throughout this Pre-Draft process and if so, what has he told you and how has he helped you?

PS: Yes, Jason is a close friend and he is always giving me advice throughout this process. He has gotten me ready to come into a business not just a sport. Another person who has helped me a lot was my mentor and my late cousin Chris Mims. He told me to always keep my body in the tubs and treat this like a business and go back to school and finish your degree because football is just the beginning and the leather ball will open doors for you that not many people even get the chance, so take every opportunity to listen to people who are successful.

TFFS: One final question, if an NFL GM were standing right in front of you and asked you, why should we draft you, what would you say to him?

PS: I am a reliable person, will do whatever it takes to get the job done and that you can rely on me.

TFFS: Thanks again for doing this. Good luck in the NFL.

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